“Not every adventure is for a cause, but there’s always a cause for adventure.”A Cause For Adventure Crew

Adventure with a conscience


For us here at A Cause For Adventure, we believe the adventures we undertake can benefit more than ourselves. We know people love following and being involved in the adventure’s story, so we turned that interest into something bigger. On our bigger adventures, we focus on fundraising for a non profit organization in conjunction with the activity, We encourage you to find a non-profit below that peaks your interest and donate today!


The A Cause For Adventure Crew are very community minded – feeling that working together and learning from each other can create the synergy that is needed to better the world. Sometimes that world is close to home, as with our efforts at local food kitchens, food banks, public radios, and community gardens. At other times, that world is helping getting supplies and clean water to an orphanage in a third-world country. While the goal of every trip may not be a community project, it is with acceptance, open-mindedness, and a willingness to help that we will always travel.

Not every adventure is for a cause, but there’s always a cause for adventure.

Access Fund

In the US, we are lucky to have much public land accessible to us. Due to the 1906 Antiquities Act, we have millions of acres of National Parks, National Monuments, Wilderness Areas, and public lands that we are free to use and explore at will. This is what the Access Fund helps to protect and provide – access to public lands.

After the recent announcement that the US Congress will vote to dismantle the 1906 Antiquities Act, thereby threatening our national monuments, starting with Bears Ears and Escalante Grand Staircase National Monuments, we can’t think of a better organization to fundraise for than the Access Fund as they fight this shortsighted, destructive agenda. We have never felt more passionate about a cause than this upcoming fight. We will be dedicating our 200+ mile backpacking trip across Scotland to the Access Fund in an effort to bring international awareness to what is sure to be a long and costly legal battle here at home.

Highlights

  • Protects public lands
  • Defending Bears Ears National Monument
  • Protects climbing access and the integrity of America’s outdoor climbing areas.


Learn More About This Project
Donate to This Non Profit Now
Crowdfunding the Trip
Placeholder
Placeholder

Homeless Garden Project

Our current cause is a major fundraiser in conjunction with our climb of Pico de Orizaba. Our goal is to raise $4,481 for Homeless Garden Project, a non-profit based in Santa Cruz, CA, the dollar amount of our feet of elevation gain from hut to summit. This amount is just slightly above the $4,250 needed to purchase a new soil tiller that will greatly expand farm productivity, increase soil utilization, and allow for program growth, culminating in more homeless people being helped though the program.

If you want to donate, receive a tax-deduction, support our trip and fundraising effort, and earn our undying love, please visit our donation page below. All donations will be passed directly onto Homeless Garden Project.

Highlights

  • Organic Garden
  • Homeless Outreach
  • Job Training

Learn More About This Project
Donate Right Now

High Fives Foundation

We participated in the Second Annual Mothership Classic, a fundraiser ski & snowboard event at Squaw Valley’s legendary KT-22 to raise money for the High Fives Foundation. We rode nonstop from bell to bell (9am-4pm) and pledged $1 per lap completed on KT-22. We completed a combined 45 laps, and we hope you join us by match our pledge to see how many money we can raise for a great cause!

Highlights

  • Injury Prevention Education
  • Injury Treatment
  • Resources for Injured Athletes


Learn More About This Project
Donate Right Now
Placeholder
Extend a Helping Hand,
Donate Today

Focus Fundraiser:
Access Fund


THE FIGHT IS ON: STAND WITH BEARS EARS
Access Fund is taking a legal stand against President Trump’s proclamation that orders a drastic reduction of Bears Ears National Monument in southeast Utah, as it would significantly impact world-renowned rock climbing.
This fight is about more than just protecting the incredible climbing at Bears Ears. Nearly 60% of our climbing areas are on federal public lands, and this proclamation threatens the very foundation of our public lands system. Bears Ears is a crucial battle in the greater fight for America’s public lands. Learn the facts.

President Trump does not have the legal authority to revoke or modify a National Monument, and Access Fund will fight this in court.

DON’T LET CONGRESS GUT THE ANTIQUITIES ACT
We need your help! Congress is getting ready to vote on the National Monument Creation and Protection Act, a dangerous bill with a misleading name that seeks to dismantle the Antiquities Act, a law that has been used for over a hundred years to protect our American heritage and exceptional natural features on our public lands.

The Antiquities Act is a fundamental conservation law that allows the President to create national monuments in order to protect federal lands when Congress is unable or unwilling to do so. It has been used by both Republican and Democratic administrations to shape our national system of protected public lands. Several classic climbing areas, including Devils Tower and Joshua Tree (now a national park), were designated as national monuments through this Act.

This bill, sponsored by Utah Congressman Bishop (R-UT), would essentially gut the Antiquities Act by:

1) Giving the President the authority to reduce an existing national monument without an act of Congress, which is currently illegal. Right now, there are 18 National Monuments that contain climbing opportunities―among them are crown jewels like Indian Creek in Utah, the Needles in California, and Devils Tower in Wyoming. If this bill is passed into law, President Trump and future presidents, could shrink or rescind national monuments like Bears Ears. A reduction of Bears Ears National Monument could expose Indian Creek and many other backcountry climbing areas to unmitigated oil and gas development. This bill threatens all 129 national monuments and puts many climbing areas across the country at risk.

2) Prohibiting landscape-scale protections for sensitive landscapes and exceptional natural features like Grand Canyon (now a national park), Black Canyon of the Gunnison (now a national park), and Bears Ears. Instead, it would only allow discrete, small-scale cultural and historic resource sites to be protected. Prohibiting landscape-scale protections without regard for the actual size of the area that needs protection is problematic because ecosystems, geographic features, historic and archaeological resources, and Native American traditional values are all interconnected. And they all contribute to high-quality recreation experiences.

3) Making it more difficult to invoke the Antiquities Act by mandating additional approval processes before the President could designate a national monument.

Access Fund

Organizations we’ve helped


Placeholder
Placeholder